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Entrevistas

In this radio program, Cultural Survival's Dev Kumar Sunuwar interviews Sele Tagivuni from Fiji and they discuss how Indigenous Peoples must be heard on matters pertaining to climate change.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar
Interviewee: Sele Tagivuni
Music: "LIBRES Y VIVAS by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

In this radio program, Cultural Survival's Dev Kumar Sunuwar interviews Jennifer Lasimbang and she tells us about the importance of Indigenous Knowledge and how it can contribute to the battle against climate change.
Produced by Shaldon Ferris (Khoisan)
Interviewee:Jennifer Lasimbang (Kadazan)
Music: "LIBRES Y VIVAS by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

Human beings have rights, but what about the rights of nature? Great Grand Mother Mary talks to us about the rights of nature. Cultural Survival attended COP27 in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.

Produced by Shaldon Ferris (Khoisan)
Interviewee:Great GrandMother Mary (Anishinaabe)
Music: "LIBRES Y VIVAS by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

In this radio interview, we spoke to Angel Levac Brant who explains that there are few voices from Indigenous youth when it comes to fighting climate change.
Producer: Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Angel Levac Brant (Tyendinaga Mohawk)
Music: "LIBRES Y VIVAS by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

In this radio program, International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change co-chair Graeme Reed talks to us about the achievements of Indigenous Peoples at previous COP meetings, and what he expects from COP27.
Producer: Shaldon Ferris (Khoisan)
Interviewee: Graeme Reed (Anishinaabe)
Music: "LIBRES Y VIVAS by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

 

In this interview, Cultural Survival's Dev Kumar Sunuwar speaks to Grace Balawang and she explains how direct access to funding for Indigenous Peoples will assist in resolving the problems that come about as a result of loss and damage created by climate change.

Producer: Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Grace Balawang (Kankaney Igorot)
Music: "LIBRES Y VIVAS by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

At the United Nations climate change conference in Paris, COP 21, governments agreed that mobilizing stronger and more ambitious climate action is urgently required to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement. Action must come from governments, cities, regions, businesses and investors. Everyone has a role to play in effectively implementing the Paris Agreement.
The Paris Agreement formally acknowledges the urgent need to scale up our global response to climate change, which supports even greater ambition from governments.

The International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change, the official caucus for Indigenous Peoples participating in the UNFCCC processes, which held its preparatory meeting on 5th and 6th November prior to UNFCCC COP27 and had a discussion on a range of issues relating to climate change to come into agreement specifically on what Indigenous Peoples will be negotiating for, in specific UNFCCC processes.

A Just Transition for Indigenous Peoples is one that centers a human rights approach and the protection of biodiversity and advances Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination in all endeavors relating to the building of green economies. Doing this will require that all stakeholders observe and fully implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the right to self-determination and Free, Prior, and Informed Consent in all decision-making.

Indigenous Peoples are not just stakeholders; Indigenous Peoples are rights holders. Cultural Survival reiterates the importance of Indigenous Peoples’ access to direct participation at the same negotiation tables as nation states at the UNFCCC COP27, with the right to have a voice and vote, and the inclusion of references to human and Indigenous Peoples’ rights in all documents.
Cultural Survival also attended COP 27, and we spoke to Indigenous delegates at the Conference.
In this interview, we spoke to Lisa Qiluqqi Koperqualuk.

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