2067 Massachusetts Ave Cambridge
(617) 441-5400

Entrevistas

Tarcila Rivera Zea is an Indigenous Peoples rights activist from Peru who believes that the promise made by the COP 28 presidency to prioritize Indigenous Peoples lacks concrete substance until it is formally documented. She states that they have heard promises of respecting their rights before but haven't seen any meaningful action follow. According to her, words alone are not enough, and they need tangible commitments embedded in the official text to hold the presidency accountable.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Tarcila Rivera Zea(Quechua)

Shree Kumar Maharjan, who is from the Newar  Indigenous People of Nepal, believes that COP28 is a significant event for launching the Indigenous Youth Platform. This platform is a crucial step forward in empowering the next generation of Indigenous youth to actively participate in climate decision-making. By including their voices and perspectives, we can better shape a sustainable future and ensure more inclusive and just climate action.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Shree Kumar Maharjan (Newar)

Jessica Vega Ortega, a young Indigenous woman from the Mixtec Indigenous Peoples of Mexico, is attending COP28 with the hope of observing the government's efforts towards implementing changes that directly impact Indigenous communities at the grassroots level. She believes that prioritizing Indigenous youth within these programs is crucial, as it ensures their voices and perspectives are heard and taken into account, ultimately shaping sustainable solutions for their future.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Jessica Vega Ortega (Mixtec)

Minnie Degawan is an Indigenous Kankanaey-Igorot from the Cordillera region in the Philippines. She believes that Indigenous women play a crucial role in the fight to preserve our planet. They act as protectors of biodiversity and are responsible for safeguarding endangered species and ecosystems. Furthermore, they are the driving force behind climate solutions, using their innovative approaches to reduce emissions and build resilience. Due to their leadership and dedication, they are instrumental in shaping a sustainable future for generations to come.

During every COP gathering, individuals and organisations who defend the land and environment, as well as Indigenous communities, voice their need for increased safeguards for their territories against industries that harm the environment, including mining, logging, and industrial agriculture. Climate organizations like Global Witness frequently send delegates to advocate for quick and ambitious measures to address the climate emergency.
Cultural Survival attended COP28 in Dubai, from 30 November to 12 December 2023, and spoke to some of the delegates who attended.

Dr. Mirna Cunningham, an Indigenous Miskita from Nicaragua says, despite progress, Indigenous Peoples face ongoing challenges from climate change and extractive industries. They demand recognition of their rights, knowledge, and role in safeguarding water, forests, and resources. COP28 must amplify their voices and address critical concerns.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Mirna Cunningham (Miskita)
"LIBRES Y VIVAS " by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.
"Burn your village to the ground", by The Halluci Nation, used with permission.

Mirian Masaquiza Jerez a senior Social Affairs Officer for the Department of Economic and Social Affairs at the United Nations says that Indigenous Peoples are actively participating in COP28 and engaging with delegates and member states. Their efforts are crucial to achieving meaningful climate action that safeguards the planet and respects Indigenous rights.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Mirian Masaquiza Jerez (Quichua)
"LIBRES Y VIVAS " by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.

Joan Carling (Kankanaey) from the Philippines says that Indigenous Peoples' collective rights, territorial and land rights, and Free, prior, and informed consent must be respected while developing renewable energy solutions. Our knowledge and experiences are crucial for addressing climate change and sustainable development. We demand to be seen as partners and valued contributors to sustainable solutions.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Joan Carling (Kankanaey)
"LIBRES Y VIVAS " by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.

Climate change is having a devastating impact on Indigenous communities, leading to droughts, floods, resource conflicts, displacement, and food insecurity. We urgently require access to water, support for our livelihoods, and a green economy that is based on Indigenous knowledge and respect. At COP28, it is crucial to establish a code of conduct that prioritizes Indigenous rights, protocols, and free, prior, informed consent. We must prioritize sustainable development over profit.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)

Despite the mechanisms in place to address climate change, including loss and damage, Indigenous peoples are still being left behind. The funding does not reach them directly, their rights are not respected, and even the new loss and damage fund excludes them. Gideon believes that we must continue to fight until the fund reaches those who need it the most.
Produced by Dev Kumar Sunuwar (Sunuwar)
Interviewee: Gideon Sanago (Maasai)
"LIBRES Y VIVAS " by MARE ADVETENCIA, used with permission.

Contact us